Drupal Theming

A recent Drupal 8 project of ours had some great requirements around it’s landing pages, aimed at reusing existing components in a range of layouts and combinations.

Base themes in Drupal are incredibly useful but often add bloat to the finished sub-theme when care isn’t taken to remove unnecessary css files, or files that are 5% used and 95% overridden. When porting aGov to Drupal 8 we took the opportunity to improve how it’s theme inheritance is managed, making it easier to create trim, lightweight sub-themes.

typey has just turned 1.0, so I thought it would be a great time to show off some of its features.

A requirement that comes up from time to time is being able to use content stored in Drupal and produce rich HTML emails. In a lot of cases the design of these emails matches the design of the existing, already implemented front-end website.

Generally speaking hiding content goes alongside a bit of javascript that unhides the content under certain circumstances (think hamburger menu).

Sometimes the content improves accessibility but is considered visual noise (says the designer).

So as the developer you have a lot of ways to... pat the cat(?) But not all cats react the same to being patted :D

At PreviousNext this past year, we have started using a style-guide-centric approach that matches our Agile development practices. We write our styles and markup as components and then use automation to build, test, and add them to a style guide.

During PreviousNext’s weekly developers meeting I recently gave a lightning talk about how to use kss-node to auto-generate a website style guide. If you’ve even tangentially followed front-end development, you’ll find that this is yet-another blog post describing “project A implementing technology B with hip, new language/framework C.”

If you’ve looked at front-end development at any time during the past four years, you know that there has been an explosion of new technologies. We are inundated with new projects like bower and cucumber and behat and KSS. It is a lot to take in.

John Albin Wilkins recently gave a session on The new Front-end work-flow from ticketing to building at DrupalGov Canberra. 

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